Governor Malloy Announces ‘Next Generation Connecticut’ Proposal

On January 31, 2013, Governor Dannel Malloy announced 'Next Generation Connecticut,' a $1.5 billion investment in UConn to support major expansions across three campuses. The proposed initiative seeks to bring thousands of jobs to the state, and, over the next ten years, catalyze hundreds of millions of dollars in research investment and business activity.

"Connecticut used to lead the world when it came to innovation--we had more patents, more groundbreaking discoveries than anywhere else in the world. Somewhere along the way the world caught up. This is about to change," said Governor Malloy. "By targeting state resources to our flagship university we ensure that our young people have the skills they need to fill the jobs we are so aggressively pursuing."

Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman added, "This initiative will fuel Connecticut's economy with new technologies and companies, patents, licenses, and high-wage STEM jobs. UConn will be not just a great place to get an education, but will be a driver of job creation and economic growth now and for generations to come."

Among other STEM-related investments and goals, the Next Generation Connecticut proposal calls for:

• Expansion of the School of Engineering by increasing enrollment by 70 percent.

• A 47 percent expansion in the total number of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) graduates.

• Addition of 50 STEM doctoral fellowships and creation of the premier STEM honors program in the U.S.

• $1.54 billion in bonding to construct new STEM facilities, build out teaching and research labs, upgrade information technology, and renovate and build additional housing and parking.

Over the next ten years, the curricular expansion and focus on STEM is expected to attract $270 million in research dollars and $527 million in business activity. The proposal will create 30,000 construction jobs and support 4,050 permanent jobs.

Data shows that from 2000 to 2010, STEM jobs grew three times faster than non-STEM jobs, and unemployment in the STEM fields are 4.4 percent lower. Responding to the needs of business, the Governor's plan will increase STEM graduates by 47 percent, turning out a workforce that is trained for real-world jobs.

The Next Generation Connecticut proposal, announced at Pratt and Whitney in East Hartford, is part of the Governor's legislative package which will be unveiled on February 6.

Comments
C.V.'s Gravatar Do you realize that only one of the four state universities offers engineering degrees (CCSU)? Researching degrees that are ABET approved (http://www.abet.org/), CT doesn't look so good. Money needs to be spent on beefing up engineering at the state schools and community colleges so that they offer ABET approved engineering programs. SCSU has an ABET approved computer science degree and Three Rivers Community College offers ABET approved programs. CCSU has ABET approved engineering programs but their civil engineering program is still not ABET approved. Not everyone can afford to go to UCONN and it's the people attending these other schools who might decide to make CT home rather than moving out of state after they graduate. Are you putting money where it really needs to be?
# Posted By C.V. | 2/1/13 11:40 AM
Cheryl Ordway Putnam's Gravatar Your comment is well appreciated, but Connecticut's pathways to an affordable and credentialed education in engineering are better than you suggest. In fact, the College of Technology (COT) is a statewide initiative that provides career pathways for students to earn certificates, A.S. and B.S. degrees in Engineering and Technology disciplines. As such, the COT allows seamless transer from the CT Community Colleges into partner ABET approved Engineering bachelor programs at many Connecticut institutions including, but not limited to, University of New Haven, Fairfield University, and University of Hartford, as well as CCSU and UCONN. Also, in addition to the Three Rivers CC, Naugatuck Valley Community College also hosts an ABET approved AS degree program. Because these engineering curriculum transfer pathways are available at all 12 community colleges, students can save a significant amount of money before transferring into the 4 year Engineering schools with Sophomore or Junior status. See http://www.ct.edu/academics/cot#about for more information!
# Posted By Cheryl Ordway Putnam | 3/18/13 11:44 AM

Learn about STEM Occupations and Career Pathways

Sample of STEM Occupations: